Guardians of the Sacraments Native American Church

NOTICE

PLEASE NOTE THE PERSON CARRYING THIS CHURCH OF COMMON SENSE/GUARDIANS OF THE SACRAMENTS NATIVE AMERICAN CHURCH (CCS/GSNAC) ID CARD, (PROVIDED THE NAME MATCHES OTHER IDENTIFICATION EVIDENCE), IS A MEMBER OF THE CHURCH OF COMMON SENSE/GUARDIANS OF THE SACRAMENTS NATIVE AMERICAN CHURCH.

1)    That this CCS/GSNAC member has proven him or herself to be a sincere follower the Church of Common Sense and/or worshiper of the Indigenous American Native Earth Based Healing Religion, known as the Native American Church, as an earth based healing religion and that the Temple of this religion is the planet earth and ‘every substance’ provided by the earth is sacred and is to be utilized as a Sacrament. GSNAC is an extension of the Kautantowit Mecautea Native American Church and thereby also by extension of Broken Arrow Native American ChurchNative American Church of the Morning Star and Half Moon and the Tuscarora Nation.

2)    That the right and privileges of any and all CCS/GSNAC members are protected by the First Amendment of the Bill of Rights of the United States Constitution and more clearly outlined by the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000, September 20, 2000.

3)    That providing the holder of this card is not in violation of the CCS/GSNAC Codes, any infringement of an CCS/GSNAC members civil liberties either through a conspiracy or any act working under the ‘color of law’ holds grievous consequences for said violator.

Title 18, U.S.C., Section 241
Conspiracy Against Rights

This statute makes it unlawful for two or more persons to conspire to injure, oppress, threaten, or intimidate any person of any state, territory or district in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him/her by the Constitution or the laws of the United States, (or because of his/her having exercised the same). It further makes it unlawful for two or more persons to go in disguise on the highway or on the premises of another with the intent to prevent or hinder his/her free exercise or enjoyment of any rights so secured.

Punishment varies from a fine or imprisonment of up to ten years, or both; and if death results, or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for any term of years, or for life, or may be sentenced to death.

Title 18, U.S.C., Section 242
Deprivation of Rights Under Color of Law

This statute makes it a crime for any person acting under color of law, statute, ordinance, regulation, or custom to willfully deprive or cause to be deprived from any person those rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution and laws of the U.S.

 This law further prohibits a person acting under color of law, statute, ordinance, regulation or custom to willfully subject or cause to be subjected any person to different punishments, pains, or penalties, than those prescribed for punishment of citizens on account of such person being an alien or by reason of his/her color or race.

 Acts under “color of any law” include acts not only done by federal, state, or local officials within the bounds or limits of their lawful authority, but also acts done without and beyond the bounds of their lawful authority; provided that, in order for unlawful acts of any official to be done under “color of any law,” the unlawful acts must be done while such official is purporting or pretending to act in the performance of his/her official duties. This definition includes, in addition to law enforcement officials, individuals such as Mayors, Council persons, Judges, Nursing Home Proprietors, Security Guards, etc., persons who are bound by laws, statutes ordinances, or customs.

 Punishment varies from a fine or imprisonment of up to one year, or both, and if bodily injury results or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire shall be fined or imprisoned up to ten years or both, and if death results, or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death.

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Cannabis is the Tuscarora’s!!

As Tuscarora, or Ska-ru-ren,  we are known and respected as being the “people of the hemp,” “hemp gatherers” or “shirt-wearers,” so-named because they traditionally wore shirts made of woven of Cannabis fibers.  Yes, we said Cannabis because That is the true botanical name of our beloved Sacred Plant… Cannabis!

The Iroquois tell that the Creator placed his people on “Turtle Island,” the North American continent, and gave them divine instructions to be caretakers of the earth. The creation tale of the Tuscarora, told by elders, states that in the beginning the world was not as we know it now. Up above, in the Sky World, a Tree of Life grew that was very special to the people of the Sky World. Beneath the Tree was a great hole, the entrance to the world. A woman who was with child fell into the hole. As she was falling she grasped at the edge and clutched in her hand some of the earth from the Sky World.

The Tuscarora are said to have received the seed from the Sky Woman who, as she fell from the sky, – grabbed seeds from the Tree of Life and they fell with her. All the gifts of earth fell from the sky, but the Tuscarora were given the hemp seed. They were given instructions on how to take care of it, how to use it – how to pray with it. It is also said that the deer came and showed the Tuscarora where to find it, and it is regarded as the seed of peace, the seed of life.

As Tuscarora, we were deemed protectors of the seed, We have an inherent right to own it, protect it, cultivate and use it… it is Our Medicine!”

George Washington signed the Canandaigua Treaty of 1794, which guaranteed the Six Nations rights to their land and a life “free and undisturbed.” The treaty also forged a “permanent friendship” with the tribes.

In Joseph Campbell’s 1983 authoritative volume The Way of the Seeded Earth: Early agrarian societies, he writes: “The Tuscarora were well-known among other tribes for their gathering and use of Indian hemp for fiber and medicine”.